Articles

Getting above the competition in the Airborne ISR Market

Getting above the competition in the Airborne ISR Market

The global market for airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms and payloads is thriving, with recent assessments pegging its latest value at close to $20 billion and forecasts of up to $43 billion by 2020. Providing a high-end, versatile capability that offers broad situational awareness, airborne ISR is the force multiplier that no modern military can be without – and recognition of this fact has led to a race for information superiority in the sky...

ISR & C2 Battle Management U.S. 2017 Attendee List

ISR & C2 Battle Management U.S. 2017 Attendee List

View the latest 2017 attendee list

New Insight: Senior figures discuss U.S. ISR developments

New Insight: Senior figures discuss U.S. ISR developments

The proliferation of ISR technologies over the past decade of conflict in the Middle East and Central Asia has led to these assets becoming a mission critical component in operations. With new operating environments come new threat types and new capability challenges. In order to maintain information dominance the Intelligence Community needs to take the global lead and strive for intelligence generation, analysis and dissemination excellence.

The following interviews were conducted at the international iteration of the Summit in February 2016, where the subject matter leaned heavily on airborne assets, but also increasingly on sensor fusion, PED and data analysis. A number of senior U.S. Air Force and NATO officers - including Maj. Gen. Jerry Harris, ACC, and Col. Dale Van Dusen, AFLCMC - joined private companies operating in the U.S. and abroad, discussing the issues they felt were of most importance in this arena. As a taster of November’s conference, we encourage our readers to explore the developments in the specific realm of American military and law enforcement and identify ways in which integration, collaboration and innovation can be improved to progress ISR into a reliable and cost-effective posture…

USAF airborne ISR capabilities set for $2.5 billion boost with Joint STARS Recapitalization programme

U.S. Air Force Col. Scott Owens, Theater Battle Control Division chief, discusses battle management priorities with industry partners during a Hanscom Representatives Association meeting in Lexington, Mass. (U.S. Air Force photo by Linda LaBonte Britt) The Joint STARS Recapitalization programme, a project designed to upgrade and modernise the U.S. Air Force’s Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS), could be worth $2.5 billion in development funding alone over the next five years according to USAF acquisition official Colonel Scott Owens.. [Access the complete article below]

U.S. Air Force prioritises investment in JSTARS programme

The U.S. Air Force is now courting enthusiastic interest from the world’s leading aerospace firms, having allocated $70 million in the FY 2015 budget request for a next-generation replacement to the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS). Current plans are to bring the new surveillance aircraft into operation by 2022. At present, the JSTARS fleet is comprised of 16 E-8C aircraft (11 operational) based on a modified Boeing 707-300 airframe, each equipped with long-range synthetic aperture radars and a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) that can find, track and identify ground targets at a distance of up to 124 miles. The current capability is still considered to be operating to a high standard, but as the platform is simply ageing, a swap-out is needed that improves and capitalises on the existing technology without trying to reinvent the wheel. In response to the requirement, Boeing announced in September that it will be pitching a variant of its 737-700